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· June, 2013

Stories about Digital Activism from June, 2013

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Japan's Most Evil Corporations

  30 June 2013

A committee of labor activists and journalists have announced the nominees for Japan's most evil corporation in 2013 [ja]. Eight corporations and organizations that lost their employees to overwork and suicide have been nominated for the disgraceful award. Web users can vote for Japan's evilest corporation here [ja], where realtime results and comments...

‘Code For Japan’ in the Works

  30 June 2013

Among others, Haruyuki Seki, a software developer at Georepublic Japan[ja] and social media consultant Hiroyasu Ichikawa are currently working toward the launch of Code For Japan [ja], an organization that aims to improve the society through technology. Members got together on June 20, 2013 and discussed prospects [ja] of collaboration among civil...

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Father of China's Great Firewall to Quit His Job as University President

  28 June 2013

Fang Binxing, an information security expert nicknamed the “father of China’s Great Fire Wall”, has resigned as president of Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications. His abrupt decision to step down--made during a university commencement speech --has ignited uproar online and touched a nerve with China’s Internet-savvy community.

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Japanese Official Suspended Over Twitter Comment

  26 June 2013

A Japanese reconstruction official in charge of helping victims of the 2011 post-tsunami meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear power plant has been taken off duty after sharp-eyed journalists unearthed tweets he wrote insulting area activists.

What Do Brazil and Turkey Have in Common?

  26 June 2013

Brazil and Turkey are thousands of kilometers away from each other, but they have something in common: both countries went out to the streets to protest for their rights as citizens and are now struggling against the excessive violence and oppression from the police. V for Vinegar is a website...

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New Regulations for Skype and Viber in Bahrain

“Security considerations” are being cited as reasons behind new regulations which could put an end to the use of popular services such as Skype, WhatsApp, Viber and Tango in Bahrain. A government official says a study is being conducted to regulate Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) applications - popular services, whose use is costing telecommunication companies.

Hacker Attacks on South and North Korea

  25 June 2013

Hacker collective Anonymous previously announced they will attack North Korean sites on June 25. But it took an unexpected turn as several major South Korean sites, including the website of South Korea's presidential office and those of media organizations, have been temporarily suspended. North Korea Tech explains in detail.

Mozambique's First Civic Hackathons

  25 June 2013

Mozambique's Ministry of Science and Technology is sponsoring the country's first civic hackathons, with the support of Sweden and Finland. The second, slated for the end of June, will focus on mobile apps in natural disaster management and flooding scenarios, frequent in the country. First prize is worth €2,000.

Senegalese to France: Dignity Before Visa

  24 June 2013

I decided to decline using my entry visa to France [..] I am waiving it off on behalf of the thousands of Senegalese citizens who deserve respect, a respect that they are often denied at the French consulate. Those are the words written by Bousso Dramé in an open letter...

Brazil: Protest Posters Turned into Song

  22 June 2013

“I turned Facebook off / to show how to be tough / There is so much stuff / that one poster is not enough”. This is the translation of the chorus of the song “Brasil em Cartaz” (Brazil in Posters), a kind of collective song and video clip made ​​from phrases on...

South Koreans Protest Electioneering

  21 June 2013

College students and civic groups took action against the National Intelligence Service (NIS)'s illegal interference with the lastest presidential election. Major universities in South Korea have released statements condemning the secret agency, the ruling party and the police. Net users have gathered 95 thousand signatures in the second round [ko] of online petition. Several protests are...

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New Law in Slovakia Would Require Citizens to Report Long Stays Abroad

  21 June 2013

Slovakia's president has vetoed a controversial new law that would require citizens who plan on leaving the country for more than 90 days to inform the nearest Ministry of Interior office of their intended whereabouts during that time. The legislation has prompted highly visible anger from Slovaks on blogs and social media.

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Brazilians Poke Fun at Intelligence Agency Spooks

  21 June 2013

In the face of protests that have swiped across Brazil, the Brazilian Intelligence Agency (ABIN) were summoned by the government to monitor protesters through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and even WhatsApp. Brazilian netizens are in fits of giggles at the news.

PR Jingle Becomes Brazil Protest Hymn

  21 June 2013

A video showing scenes of police violence against the protests that took to the streets of Sao Paulo in the first week of June with the song “Vem Pra Rua” (Take to the Streets) in the voice of Brazilian reggae/rock band O Rappa‘s Marcelo Falcão is going viral [pt]. With...

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Thousands Are Joining Bosnia's ‘Babylution’

  20 June 2013

The death of a baby girl has people in Bosnia-Herzegovina crossing the country's deep ethnic divides by the thousands to protest together against the government's failure to remedy a lapse in the law that is preventing newborns from being given an identity number and, by extension, travel papers and healthcare.

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A Year of Demanding Justice in Paraguay: What Happened in Curuguaty?

  20 June 2013

A year after a clash that resulted in the death of 11 farm workers and 6 police officers in Curuguaty, Paraguay, organizations that defend human rights and farm workers point out that the criminal case investigating the incident is partial and that there were several human rights violations during the proceedings, such as executions and subjecting the farm workers to torture as acts of revenge.

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