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· October, 2010

Stories about Development from October, 2010

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Benin: Text Messages to Help Protect Children Against Violence: Lessons Learned

  19 October 2010

The Violence Against Children (VAC) project is an initiative co-implemented by PLAN and Save the Children in West Africa and takes place over 4 years in seven countries. The project explored the idea of setting up a text message based system that will collect and map out reports of violence against children. The following is a discussion about the impact and lessons learned on the implementation so far.

El Salvador: Demanding Local Food

  18 October 2010

Colleen O'Brien begins her post “Growing Local Food Demand” asking, “Local food in El Salvador? It certainly exists, even though farmers markets, CSAs and advocates don’t abound in this country.” She later writes, “Fresh food for the urbanites, steady incomes for the campesinos. Is it just a pipe dream? I...

Africa: Growth, Innovation and Transport

  18 October 2010

Stephen writes about growth, innovation and transport in the development of Sub Saharan Africa economies: “Many people recognize that access to adequate transport services is vital for development. Since 1987, the Sub-Saharan Africa Transport Policy Program (SSATP)—a partnership driven by 36 countries—has been working with governments and regional organizations to...

India: Village Health Issues

  18 October 2010

Brijesh Nair visited a village in the state of Tamil Nadu in India and found that the drinking water infrastructure in a “lower caste community” was in poor condition causing health issues among the village people.

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China: Riot Against Land Acquisition in Guangxi

  16 October 2010

On 13 of October, a riot broke out in Longxu town in Guangxi province. Around one thousand villagers confronted armed police against forced land acquisition. Citizen reports on the riot were originally posted at local online forums within Guangxi, but quickly deleted by web censor authorities. In order to spread...

El Salvador: ‘There's no water’

  15 October 2010

For Blog Action Day, Linda writes: “Usually, no hay agua [meaning, “there is no water”] is a temporary condition, and the water returns. Yet as more and more demands are placed on our water systems, and less and less care is taken to preserve and recycle water well, no hay...

Bolivia: The Effects of Climate Change on Water

  15 October 2010

Pablo Rivero blogs at Purple Fire [es] for Blog Action Day: “Bolivia is a country with great nature reserves, among them, fresh water. However, in the last years, the effects of climate change have left notorious and dramatic footprints.” He provides various links for more information, including a blog dedicated...

Honduras: The Lack of Clean Water

  15 October 2010

Laurie says that statistics on water conditions are “too big to grasp! But here in the elbow of Central America, I get it. Water, or the lack of clean water, kills people. They get diarrhea, cholera or hepatitis. They lose their kids. Their hope. They stay in poverty.” Laurie knows...

Africa: Write About Water in Africa for Blog Action Day

  15 October 2010

You are invited to blog about water in Africa for Blog Action Day: “Happy Blog Action Day everyone! The topic this year is WATER. Kabissa members are invited to blog about water in AFRICA. You can send in your posts via email to connect@groups.kabissa.org or post online to http://kabissa.org/group/connect (if...

Zimbabwe: A Few Facts About Water in Zimbabwe

  15 October 2010

Today is Blog Action Day today, and the theme this year is ‘Water’. Here are few facts about water in Zimbabwe: * Only one fifth of Zimbabwe’s population has access to clean water * 900 cases and 25 deaths have been recorded as a result of cholera in Zimbabwe in...

Caucasus: Women as a reflection of nationalism

  15 October 2010

Motherhood, Repatriation and other fictions comments on a recent event staged in Istanbul, Turkey, which women activists from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, South Ossetia, Abkhazia and Russia attended. The blog particularly examines the role of nationalism and patriarchal societies in peace-building and cross-border initiatives in the South Caucasus.

Azerbaijan: Blog Action Day

  15 October 2010

Flying Carpets and Broken Pipelines marks Blog Action Day by examining the situation in its native Azerbaijan. The blog says that while the country is rich in energy, it lags behind in providing its citizens with clean drinking water with the situation even worse outside of the capital, Baku.

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Brazil: Research and Advances in Renewable Energy Sources

  13 October 2010

In recent decades, Brazil has received acclaim as a country of clean energy, with alternative and renewable sources playing a major role in the country’s energy mix. The inclusion of these sources, which has been made possible thanks to research conducted by various social players and to the government’s adoption, is being discussed in many Brazilian blogs.

Jamaica: (Wo)man of the Year

  11 October 2010

Active Voice explains why Diana McCaulay is her candidate for Man of the Year: “It takes balls for a single woman to go up against the state in the way [she] has…Diana McCaulay has almost singlehandedly been taking the fight to the authorities on the matter of the proposed transformation...

Bangladesh: Increase In Cost Of Living

  9 October 2010

An Ordinary Citizen wonders whether the Bangladesh government should “take necessary steps to keep the inflation controlled and to reduce the cost of living” to avoid loss of faith among common citizens.

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