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· November, 2014

Stories about Censorship from November, 2014

29 November 2014

Morehshin Allahyari's Art on Iranian Censorship Will Soon Be Out of This World

Iran’s censored Internet is a theme that features prominently in Morehshin Allahyari's art, some of which will soon be headed to outer space as part of the Forever Now project.

Selfies, ‘Sandwich Parties’ and ‘The Hunger Games': How Activists Have Challenged Thailand's Martial Law

Six months have passed since the army grabbed power and declared martial law in Thailand. During this time, Thai citizens have used various forms of protests against the junta.

27 November 2014

The Story Behind Iran's Censorship Redirect Page


When Internet users in Iran try to access a blocked website, they're taken to The page has changed throughout the years, reflecting the government's evolving approach to censorship.

25 November 2014

The Silent Crackdown on Serbian Media


"Censorship is no longer a relic of the past, it's the present that we must fight against."

China Touts Local Ground Rules for the Global Internet


While attendees at last week's World Internet Conference in China enjoyed relatively open Internet access, thousands of websites were blocked throughout much of the country.

24 November 2014

Venezuela: Draft Law Would Criminalize Online Protest, Remove Checks on Surveillance


Under the law, a person using digital media to “promote or attack the constitutional order” or “disrupt public peace” could face between one and five years behind bars.

In Putin's Russia, Hell Is Other Liberals

RuNet Echo

The speed and vigor with which Russia’s intelligentsia turned on Alexey Venediktov in such a short time would be nothing short of amazing, were it anything unusual in Moscow.

‘Humour Is a Sharp Weapon Challenging an Authoritarian Regime’

Chinese political cartoonist Biantailajiao, who now lives in Japan after being labeled a traitor in mainland press, says dictators have no sense of humour.

19 November 2014

Fake ‘Ukrainian’ News Websites Run by Russian ‘Troll Army’ Offshoots

RuNet Echo

A new investigation of Russia's information war has revealed fake 'Ukrainian' news sites are actually hosted, operated, and staffed in Russia without any local correspondents.

15 November 2014

TV Host Replaced on Orders of Thai Junta

The program host was dismissed after featuring interviews with farmers and rural villagers about their thoughts on the country's political situation.

14 November 2014

Online Campaign to Support Russian LGBT Teens Is Charged with ‘Gay Propaganda’

RuNet EchoAdvox

It is hard to underestimate the chilling effect the crackdown on Children-404 might have. The LGBT community is one of the least respected, most maligned groups in Russian society.

13 November 2014

Does the Kremlin Help Its Enemies?

RuNet Echo

There are certain news outlets in Russia you don’t expect to publish stories accusing the government of funding Vladimir Putin’s enemies, but that is exactly what happened last week.

The Gambia: Blogger Arrested, then Freed As Online Outrage Escalates


The blogger was released as students planned mass demonstrations to demand his freedom. His arrest attracted substantial condemnation on social media.

Venezuela: E-Commerce Bill Would Give Authorities New Avenue for Online Censorship


The first draft of the e-commerce bill grants the telecommunications authority new powers to block websites found in breach of the bill's restrictions.

7 November 2014

Ekho Moskvy Journalist Fired Over “Insensitive” Tweet, Radio Station's Fate In Limbo

RuNet Echo

A comment made on Twitter by a veteran Ekho Moskvy journalist has caused him trouble with the radio station's owners and possibly cost him his job.

3 November 2014

Corporate Critics Say Vietnam's New Tech Regulations Are Bad for Business


Vietnam has drafted two Internet-related decrees which impose stricter regulations on tech companies, Internet users, and online transactions. Are these regulations necessary or are they excessive?

Apple's China Experience Sours as State Hackers Target iCloud Data


Experts see the attacks as emblematic of the proverbial price paid by foreign companies that choose to make their services available in China.

This Virtual Museum in Lebanon is Winning Censorship Battles

Thalia Rahme reports on the state of censorship in her country Lebanon, through an interview with those behind the Virtual Museum of Censorship.

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