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Stories from RuNet Echo from February, 2014

27 February 2014

Chechen Dictator and Russian Nationalist NOT Taking Over Ukraine

As conflict in Ukraine's province of Crimea escalates, Internet hoaxes muddy the waters.

26 February 2014

Yanukovich's Fabulous Palace Familiar to Russians

Russians, admittedly, are already familiar with examples of their own politicians' wealth and bad taste, as photos of their residences regularly leak onto the Internet.

25 February 2014

From Kiev to Moscow: Russia's Tired Protest Antics

As a futile gesture of defiance Russian protesters brought several tires to a Moscow protest against political prisoners.

24 February 2014

Big, Bad Bullies of the Russian Media

Last week, popular journalist Vladimir Solovyov dedicated an entire radio show to dissecting and denouncing the Maidan-supportive tweets of a handful of students from Moscow’s Higher School of Economics. Why?

Ukrainian Revolution Rattles Russian Nationalists

Russian nationalists worry Russian-speaking Ukrainians will be "derussified."

22 February 2014

Pro-Maidan Video Goes Viral Thanks to Pavel Durov, Russia's Zuckerberg

Given the political climate in Russia now, Durov's willingness to stake such an unabashedly pro-opposition position on the Ukraine crisis is rather astounding.

21 February 2014

Russian Politicians Stick to Their Guns as Ukraine Burns

For Russia's politicians, the battle lines over Ukraine have already been drawn, and now there can be no compromise.

20 February 2014

Russians Eye Ukrainian Turmoil with Hope, Fear

"Seriously, 13 wounded armed cops equals urban warfare"

18 February 2014

To Hell with the Games: Russians Turn from Sochi to Ukraine

Today, after a relative lull, violence returned to Kiev’s streets, causing a dramatic shift in RuNet activity. Indeed, the images coming out of Ukraine depict something like a civil war.

16 February 2014

The Hilarity of Murder Among Russians

Where do you draw the line between a joke and a death threat? That question has been on Russians’ minds this week, after a controversial tweet by blogger Alexey Navalny.

15 February 2014

Blood on the Ice, Fury on the Tubes

Drama is never far behind when the Russian and the USA national hockey teams meet on the ice.

13 February 2014

Welcome All to Russia's 2014 Olympic Hunger Games

Another way to poke fun at Russia's hosting of the Winter Games has emerged: comparisons between the Olympics and the wildly popular Hunger Games franchise.

11 February 2014

Russia's Patriotic Overdrive in Sochi?

The Soviet Union may have defeated Hitler, but modern-day Russia’s war against fascism wages on. And the Sochi Olympics have amplified the fight.

8 February 2014

I've Got 99 Sochi Problems

Russian bloggers debated the necessity of criticizing the Olympic games.

The Dependence of Russian Independent Television

For some Russians online, a recent press conference has turned attention away from political repression toward questions about the television business and TV Rain’s troubled past in that industry.

7 February 2014

A Riot Within Pussy Riot?

"Since we are now on opposite sides of the barricades with Nadya and Masha, separate us. Remember, we are no longer Nadya and Masha, they are no longer Pussy Riot."

6 February 2014

Moscow School Shooting: Firsthand Accounts and Mistaken Identities

"The MPs are thinking small. To avoid school shootings, you shouldn't ban guns, you should ban schools"

2 February 2014

13 Olympic Memes as Sochi Games Approach

RuNet Echo takes a look back at some of the funnier jokes that the Russian online community made about the Sochi Olympics during the years of preparation

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