· February, 2012

Below are posts about citizen media in Russian. Don't miss Global Voices по-русски, where Global Voices posts are translated into Russian! Read about our Lingua project to learn more about how Global Voices content is being translated into other languages.

Stories about Russian from February, 2012

Russia: Great Lent Has Begun

RuNet Echo  29 February 2012

Citizen media outlets have captured the multidimensional essence of the Russian Orthodox Lenten season, which began on Monday, including issues such the religiosity of post-USSR Russia, the liturgical calendar, the peculiarities of the Orthodox traditions and fasting rituals compared to those observed in the West, and the public statements made by prominent church officials.

Russia: The “Big White Circle” Protest in Moscow

RuNet Echo  27 February 2012

On Sunday, Feb. 26, thousands of people gathered in central Moscow for the Big White Circle protest, forming a human chain along most of the length of the Russian capital's 15.6-kilometer/9.7-mile Garden Ring, protesting against corruption and demanding a fair presidential election, which is to take place in one week, on March 4.

Russia: Navalny vs Kadyrov

RuNet Echo  22 February 2012

At Jamestown Foundation Blog, Valery Dzutsev reports that Ramzan Kadyrov, the President of Chechnya, has called politician and anti-corruption activist Alexei Navalny “a real chatterbox” – and Navalny retaliated by publishing (here and, later, here; ru) “the results of his investigation of the Chechen police’s car inventory acquisitions, naming and...

Georgia: Assassination attempt on Abkhazia leader

  22 February 2012

ЖЖ Сухуми სოხუმი cyxymu [RU] updates its readers on another assassination attempt made today on the defacto President of Georgia's breakaway Abkhazia region, Alexander Ankvab. The blog reports one bodyguard was killed, with another two wounded, in the fifth attempt on Ankvab's life since 2005.

Russia: DDoS Attack Puts Down Several Political Websites As Cyberwar Escalates

RuNet Echo  9 February 2012

On February 9, 2012, following the widely-discussed leaks of pro-Kremlin mailboxes, LiveJournal, where the leaks were published, became temporarily unavailable, Lenta.ru reported [ru]. Russian representative of Anonymous group @OP_Russia, suggested [ru] that it was a DDoS attack to hide the evidence of massive wrongdoings (including corruption, thievery, political provocations, and cybercrime) [ru] by...

Russia: New .Ru Domain Registration Rules Allow Easy Domain Seizure

RuNet Echo  8 February 2012

Andrey Rylkov Foundation writes about the first case of enforcement of the domain seizure rules in the “.ru” and “.рф” domain zones. The rules [ru] (Article 5, point 5.5) , updated on November 11, 2011 allow any law enforcement agency (like police, Federal Security Service, Prosecutor's office or Federal Drug Control Services (FDCS)) to request...

Russia: The Anonymous Hacks and Publishes E-mails of Pro-Kremlin Youth Group

RuNet Echo  8 February 2012

Read The Guardian's take on the so-called “Potupchik-gate,” a series of scandals surfaced as a result of hacking and publishing of private inbox of Kristina Potupchik [ru], press-secretary of Nashi, notorious pro-Kremlin youth group. All hacks were published by twitter-user @OP_Russia who uses Anonymous symbolics. Representatives of Anonymous, previously never seen involved...

Russia: Day of Protests Divides Citizens

RuNet Echo  5 February 2012

Despite temperatures of -20 degrees, thousands of Russians went out to the streets to participate in election manifestations. Some, organised online, were protesting against the elections and possible re-election of prime minister Vladimir Putin. Others, partly organised by pressure and bribes as well as fear of possible revolutions manifested that Putin should stay.

Kyrgyzstan: “Putin Is a Complex Bio-Robot”

  3 February 2012

Ex-presidential candidate Arstanbek Abdylaev, scourge of the Kyrgyz Internet, has struck again. In a recent press conference he disclosed his world conspiracy theories, including a claim that Russian Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, is a “complex bio-robot.”

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