· November, 2011

Stories about LANGUAGES from November, 2011

Jamaica: Sabina Park & Lawrence Rowe

  29 November 2011

Active Voice gives a Twitter follower a tour of Jamaica's famous Sabina Park, and makes a plea for the powers-that-be to bring back the Lawrence Rowe Players Pavilion.

Guyana: Calling Violence Against Women by Name

  29 November 2011

CODE RED “felt very frustrated yesterday when someone told [her] that to say ‘violence against women’ is discriminatory, that it should be called ‘relationship violence'”, explaining: “There are a range of gendered ways in which women are targeted for violence, not all of which are ‘domestic’. Erasing the language feminists...

Iran: Raid on UK embassy

  29 November 2011

Amin Sabeti, blogger, linked to a picture which shows a man taking a poster of Pulp Fiction movie out of the UK embassy, wrote [Fa] in his Friendfeed page: “Look at this police! How strong he was reacting toward protestors!”

China: Regulation on Entertainment excessiveness

  29 November 2011

Recently the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT) has issued another regulation, the prohibition of interruption of dramas with ads, to address the issue of “entertainment excessiveness”. The China media project further discusses how the institutional nature of the television networks that will be impacted by the SARFT...

North Korea Ranked 3rd in Deforestation

  29 November 2011

North Korean Economy Watch blog consolidated current reports on severe deforestation in North Korea. According to one risk analysis firm, North Korea had the third highest deforestation rate among 180 countries surveyed and the UN estimates that North Korea had lost almost one-third of its entire forest mass.

Iran:“Battlefield 3″ in Tehran

  28 November 2011

Ali Nazifpour, believes Battlefield 3, a video game which includes a search for nuclear bombs in a future Iran, portraits a very inaccurate, ridiculous picture of Iran.An online petition launched against this game.

East Timor: Building One Country Out of Many Languages

  28 November 2011

When East Timor became an independent country in 2002, both the Tetum and Portuguese languages were chosen as official for the newborn country. Nevertheless, the number of national languages is up to 16 and dozens of other dialects are used on a daily basis by Timorese citizens.

Guatemala: Survivors’ Testimonies Help Define Genocide in Online Documentary

  28 November 2011

Mike shares Spanish-language documentary “Our Voice, Our Memory: The genocide in Guatemala,” which is available in full on YouTube. He adds: “The documentary […] uses survivor and expert testimony to explain the concept of genocide, demonstrating how the atrocities committed by the Guatemalan military against indigenous Maya communities satisfy the...

Venezuela's Slow Internet

  28 November 2011

Luis Carlos Díaz blogs [es] about Venezuela's slow internet broadband, reporting that Venezuela ranks 163 out of 174 countries in download speed. Luis Carlos argues that Venezuelan netizens are settling for too little, and that anyone who aspires to the presidency for the 2012 elections should add this issue to...

Bangladesh: Climate Change to Increase Hunger and Malnutrition

  28 November 2011

As governments gear up for COP17, which starts today, experts are warning that among climate change's greatest consequences in developing countries are the risks to the agriculture sector, including an increased risk of food insecurity. Bangladesh is among the top five most vulnerable countries.

Venezuela: World Meeting of Body Art Takes Over Caracas

  28 November 2011

This year, Caracas hosted The World Meeting of Body Art and some of its most striking expressions were shared through citizen media. Among these creations, indigenous peoples of Venezuela were given a special space to showcase their artistic expressions on the human skin.

Cuba: Entrepreneurship & Home Ownership

  28 November 2011

Generation Y wonders whether the country's new wave of entrepreneurs will survive, while Laritza's Laws is concerned that “the housing regulations, recently enacted by the government of Cuba…leave intact regulations that impede the full exercise of the right of ownership.”